Installer ce thème
Cyclo-Muletier by cycledefrance on Flickr.
Maurice Maître climbing the Col du Parpaillon over military “mule paths” in the early 1930s. His 650B bike is equipped with a Cyclo derailleur, two frame mounted brakes and an additional drum brake. Maître was a prolific cyclotourist and a disciple of Vélocio, who went “mountain biking” on these same tracks some 30 years earlier. Nowadays the Route du Parpaillon is still as rough. (thanks to Cycle de France for the picture !)

Cyclo-Muletier by cycledefrance on Flickr.

Maurice Maître climbing the Col du Parpaillon over military “mule paths” in the early 1930s. His 650B bike is equipped with a Cyclo derailleur, two frame mounted brakes and an additional drum brake. Maître was a prolific cyclotourist and a disciple of Vélocio, who went “mountain biking” on these same tracks some 30 years earlier. Nowadays the Route du Parpaillon is still as rough.

(thanks to Cycle de France for the picture !)

Building the Brooklands circuit, early 1900’s.

Building the Brooklands circuit, early 1900’s.

This is not an Instagram picture. 

This is not an Instagram picture. 

Biagio Cavanna, The Man Who “Saw” With His Hands
By Owen Mulholland
A tall, rather frail looking young amateur cyclist, accompanied by two friends, hesitantly knocked on the door. Moments seemed like minutes before the sound of shuffling feet told them their knock had been heard. The door opened revealing an imposing figure. Weighing at least 250 pounds and wearing darkly tinted, black-framed sunglasses, the man had, at least, a reassuring voice.
"Hello Domenico," he greeted them. "I’ve been waiting for you and your friends. "Please do come in." Handshakes were made, and the moment he grasped the tall one’s hand he exclaimed, "Ah, yes, you must be the young Fausto Coppi about whom we’ve heard so much of late.”
The young men were ushered down a hallway and into a simple room whose main adornment was a massage table. There each undressed so that the renowned “Wizard of Cycling”, the “Muscle Magician”, might work his magic.
His name was Biago Cavanna and by 1938 he was a legend in cycling circles.Girardengo, Binda, Guerra, all the greats of Italian cycling for two generations, had passed through his hands.
Now he was starting on a third generation. As the three young men prepared to leave, the blind masseur pulled Coppi aside. Fausto almost trembled in his presence. Cavanna spoke seriously now, all trace of warmth gone. The old man had just made a discovery and in his own way was just as excited as the shy youth in front of him.
"Listen to me," he intoned. "My hands see more than my eyes. My ears hear what can’t be heard. Your lung capacity, heart strength and muscles indicate you can become a great champion. Believe me, I am not mistaken. Will you do as I say?"
Coppi could barely stammer out an, “Of course.”
"Then do not race for the next three months."
"But I must race," Fausto replied. "It’s how I make my living."
"I am sorry for you," Cavanna sighed. "There is nothing I can do for you. You see, you must build yourself up. Eat meat every day."
Even though he could not understand the master’s reasoning, Coppi returned home, determined to follow his advice.
He abandoned the rest of the season and prepared the following spring under the direct “gaze” of the blind man. The rest is, of course, history. Fausto Coppi remains the greatest cyclist Italy has ever produced and for exactly twenty years his superb physique received daily attention from the blind wizard, Biago Cavanna.
Of course, being associated with Coppi did nothing to diminish the remarkable masseur’s allure. Coppi never forgot what Cavanna had done for him and wasn’t the least bit protective of his services.
In the off-season promising young riders practically stood in line to receive the magician’s appraisal. One of the most illustrious was Jacques Anquetil, who, untilBernard Hinault, was the greatest post-WW II French rider. Like Coppi, Anquetil had been a prodigy as an amateur.
Anquetil gave himself the “three race test”. He told himself, “If I don’t win one of the first three races I enter, then I’ll give it up and go back to picking strawberries with my father”. If nothing else, the young man was serious about what he did.
Nevertheless, he needn’t have worried. He won all three races! He turned professional towards the end of the following season, 1953, and promptly won his first major event in that category, the Grand Prix des Nations.
The rapidity of his development amazed many, including himself. He decided to visit Coppi at his home in Italy. Coppi was king of cycling in 1953 and the young Frenchman wanted a close-up look at the demi-god. Maybe he could glean some secrets from a man who, at 34, still obviously held the keys to top form. And then there was the sorcerer, Biago Cavanna. His “first hand” analysis would surely be interesting.
After the initial greetings and Jacques was stretched on the massage table, Cavanna spoke Italian as he worked. Coppi translated. “You must have a regulated life. Nothing must upset your rhythm. Don’t eat too much, and what you do eat should be simple. A little wine is OK, but sans excess. Most importantly, drink mineral water to help your body get rid of toxins. This is the regimen. Don’t let any alibi keep you from it.”
Anquetil thought, “Coppi has exposed his credo. This is what Cavanna has demanded and I know Coppi follows it to the letter. But is it good for me? Is it indispensable?” He interrogated himself but gave no answer to Coppi.
"I knew," Anquetil wrote later, "I would never become hostage to such regulations. I had my car, nice clothes, money, trips and beautiful hotels to stay in. Had I sacrificed so much not to enjoy champagne? Never!"
Of course Jacques was discreet enough not to voice these reservations and Coppi was so impressed that he invited the young visitor from Normandy to come live with him. But Anquetil knew he had to follow his own path and declined the honor.
I have never found what Cavanna thought of Anquetil’s somewhat loose approach to professional discipline. In fact there is little further mention of Cavanna in the various accounts of Coppi’s last years. Their stars appear to have faded together.
source

Biagio Cavanna, The Man Who “Saw” With His Hands

By Owen Mulholland



A tall, rather frail looking young amateur cyclist, accompanied by two friends, hesitantly knocked on the door. Moments seemed like minutes before the sound of shuffling feet told them their knock had been heard. The door opened revealing an imposing figure. Weighing at least 250 pounds and wearing darkly tinted, black-framed sunglasses, the man had, at least, a reassuring voice.

"Hello Domenico," he greeted them. "I’ve been waiting for you and your friends. "Please do come in." Handshakes were made, and the moment he grasped the tall one’s hand he exclaimed, "Ah, yes, you must be the young Fausto Coppi about whom we’ve heard so much of late.”

The young men were ushered down a hallway and into a simple room whose main adornment was a massage table. There each undressed so that the renowned “Wizard of Cycling”, the “Muscle Magician”, might work his magic.

His name was Biago Cavanna and by 1938 he was a legend in cycling circles.GirardengoBinda, Guerra, all the greats of Italian cycling for two generations, had passed through his hands.

Now he was starting on a third generation. As the three young men prepared to leave, the blind masseur pulled Coppi aside. Fausto almost trembled in his presence. Cavanna spoke seriously now, all trace of warmth gone. The old man had just made a discovery and in his own way was just as excited as the shy youth in front of him.

"Listen to me," he intoned. "My hands see more than my eyes. My ears hear what can’t be heard. Your lung capacity, heart strength and muscles indicate you can become a great champion. Believe me, I am not mistaken. Will you do as I say?"

Coppi could barely stammer out an, “Of course.”

"Then do not race for the next three months."

"But I must race," Fausto replied. "It’s how I make my living."

"I am sorry for you," Cavanna sighed. "There is nothing I can do for you. You see, you must build yourself up. Eat meat every day."

Even though he could not understand the master’s reasoning, Coppi returned home, determined to follow his advice.

He abandoned the rest of the season and prepared the following spring under the direct “gaze” of the blind man. The rest is, of course, history. Fausto Coppi remains the greatest cyclist Italy has ever produced and for exactly twenty years his superb physique received daily attention from the blind wizard, Biago Cavanna.

Of course, being associated with Coppi did nothing to diminish the remarkable masseur’s allure. Coppi never forgot what Cavanna had done for him and wasn’t the least bit protective of his services.

In the off-season promising young riders practically stood in line to receive the magician’s appraisal. One of the most illustrious was Jacques Anquetil, who, untilBernard Hinault, was the greatest post-WW II French rider. Like Coppi, Anquetil had been a prodigy as an amateur.

Anquetil gave himself the “three race test”. He told himself, “If I don’t win one of the first three races I enter, then I’ll give it up and go back to picking strawberries with my father”. If nothing else, the young man was serious about what he did.

Nevertheless, he needn’t have worried. He won all three races! He turned professional towards the end of the following season, 1953, and promptly won his first major event in that category, the Grand Prix des Nations.

The rapidity of his development amazed many, including himself. He decided to visit Coppi at his home in Italy. Coppi was king of cycling in 1953 and the young Frenchman wanted a close-up look at the demi-god. Maybe he could glean some secrets from a man who, at 34, still obviously held the keys to top form. And then there was the sorcerer, Biago Cavanna. His “first hand” analysis would surely be interesting.

After the initial greetings and Jacques was stretched on the massage table, Cavanna spoke Italian as he worked. Coppi translated. “You must have a regulated life. Nothing must upset your rhythm. Don’t eat too much, and what you do eat should be simple. A little wine is OK, but sans excess. Most importantly, drink mineral water to help your body get rid of toxins. This is the regimen. Don’t let any alibi keep you from it.”

Anquetil thought, “Coppi has exposed his credo. This is what Cavanna has demanded and I know Coppi follows it to the letter. But is it good for me? Is it indispensable?” He interrogated himself but gave no answer to Coppi.

"I knew," Anquetil wrote later, "I would never become hostage to such regulations. I had my car, nice clothes, money, trips and beautiful hotels to stay in. Had I sacrificed so much not to enjoy champagne? Never!"

Of course Jacques was discreet enough not to voice these reservations and Coppi was so impressed that he invited the young visitor from Normandy to come live with him. But Anquetil knew he had to follow his own path and declined the honor.

I have never found what Cavanna thought of Anquetil’s somewhat loose approach to professional discipline. In fact there is little further mention of Cavanna in the various accounts of Coppi’s last years. Their stars appear to have faded together.

source


Lovely belgian TT video edit … see you on Sunday around Gedinne!

Jean Stablinski riding cyclo-cross

Roger de Vlaeminck, 6th April 1974, Roubaix Velodrome. Second victory on northern cobbles for the Gipsy!

Roger de Vlaeminck, 6th April 1974, Roubaix Velodrome. Second victory on northern cobbles for the Gipsy!

Wichlor arrived this morning in Istanbul!

 Samuel Becuwe (#32) 11d 23h 05m 11th place. (Perhaps the most feral so far) #tcr2014 @PEdALEDjapan @brooksengland pic.twitter.com/7detv2Iw8j

Wichlor arrived this morning in Istanbul!

 
Samuel Becuwe (#32) 11d 23h 05m 11th place. (Perhaps the most feral so far)

Wichlor pictured by 200 Magazine while climbing the Stelvio … tough boy!

Wichlor pictured by 200 Magazine while climbing the Stelvio … tough boy!

Robin Williams was also a passionate cyclist, enjoying rides with Lance Armstrong, commuting in NYC with his Colnago, or detailing Pergoretti’s work at NAHBS. 

May his soul rest in peace!

Colnago bike, rainbow jersey, n°1 bib, Mapei outfit … Johan Museeuw, Paris-Roubaix 1997

Colnago bike, rainbow jersey, n°1 bib, Mapei outfit … Johan Museeuw, Paris-Roubaix 1997

My friend Alex sprinted hard to become the first-ever european champion of penny farthing ! This last saturday in Belgium … congrats! 

My friend Alex sprinted hard to become the first-ever european champion of penny farthing ! This last saturday in Belgium … congrats! 

My friend Wichlor is one of the two frenchies engaged in this year’s Transcontinental race … follow him during his amazing trip from London to Istanbul here but also on Twitter and via the tracker … Good luck man!

My friend Wichlor is one of the two frenchies engaged in this year’s Transcontinental race … follow him during his amazing trip from London to Istanbul here but also on Twitter and via the tracker … Good luck man!